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All Opioids Articles

A perspective on several common terms that are widely used by pain practitioners but often are misunderstood by professionals, patients, the general public, and the media.
A multitude of pharmacokinetic changes that occur with aging should be considered when pain prescribers consider which medications to prescribe to avoid drug-drug interactions in the elderly.
Pain practitioners are urged to recognize painful genetic disorders, which fall into 3 categories: connective tissue, metabolic, and neurologic, as they require aggressive, palliative pain care for these usually progressive conditions.
In this Guest Editor's Memo, Seddon R. Savage, MD, MS, discusses issues of treating opioid use disorder in patients with chronic pain.
Family physicians are presented with a pain management roadmap for setting realistic treatment expectations with the chronic pain patient, including when and how to wean off opioids.
Challenging insurance policies that hinder management of opioid use disorders.
Identifying and treating opioid use disorders in patients on long-term opioid therapy is challenging, and must be distinguished from drug-seeking behaviors.
In a patient with chronic pain who develops an opioid use disorder (OUD), what factors go into the decision of whether or not to wean the patient off opioids? Jordan L. Newmark, MD
Readers are better informed about use of the PPM Opioid Calculator and the benefits of metformin.
Given the recent focus on the opioid abuse epidemic, Practical Pain Management asked the authors to review what efforts the FDA has taken to help combat abuse of these medications.
Dr. Forest Tennant, MD, explores the impact that the CDC opioid-prescribing guidelines have had on chronic pain patients.
Call the forgotten opioid, physicians are rediscovering levorphanol as a safe and effective pain medication.
There are no perfect medications. This applies to both nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and opioids. A high level of mortality is associated with both NSAIDs and opioids.
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