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All Oral and Maxillofacial Pain Articles

Topical applications for trigeminal neuralgia, painful post-traumatic trigeminal neuropathy, burning mouth syndrome, myofascial pain, and TMJ arthralgia. Plus, cannabinoid spray and traumeel in orofacial treatment.
Approximately 10 million Americans suffer from TMD. Acupuncture may useful treatment options for this painful disorder.
The new criteria for the diagnosis of temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) comprise an improved screening tool to help researchers and health professionals more readily differentiate the most common forms of TMD and reach accurate diagnoses that are grounded in supportive scientific evidence, according to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), a part of the Nati
Since we originally wrote about this topic in 2011,1 there have been some advancements in the literature on temporomandibular joint and muscle disorders, or temporomandibular disorders (TMDs).
Read this article on tooth pain and loss in the chronic pain population: Recently, an increasing number of chronic pain patients and their treating practitioners are recognizing the loss of teeth as a source of aggravation, suffering, and even increased pain.
It has been estimated that 25% of the general population has TMD—a group of pathologies that affect the masticatory muscles (myogenous) and/or the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) (arthrogenous). Disability related to this disorder also has been found to have a major influence on socioeconomic factors and is associated with decreased employment.
An estimated 75% of Americans will experience symptoms of temporomandibular joint and muscle disorder (TMJMD) in their lifetime. Article discusses how early treatment is essential for dealing with this potentially chronic pain disorder.
Article discusses superior pharyngeal constrictor muscle pain. This retrospective observational study of patients with unresolved wrist pain noted improvements in many quality of life parameters after Hackett-Hemwall dextrose prolotherapy.
The hyoid bone has been identified with a specific, although not well recognized, pain syndrome for over 40 years.2 The painful symptoms are generally caused by trauma at the greater cornu of the hyoid bone with the pain radiating to other sites.3
This article discusses the diagnosis and treatment of temporal tendonitis—a very common disorder that is often mistaken for a migraine.
A retrospective study of two groups of patients yields some insight into the relationship of TMD and headaches.
Splenius capitis muscle syndrome—a commonly occurring headache, neck ache, and facial pain disorder—typically mimics the respective pain patterns of temporal tendonitis and migraine headaches.
Characterized as a painful complex of symptoms related to the insertion of the stylomandibular ligament (SML) at the mandible, onset of Ernest syndrome. Learn more about this chronic pain disorder.
Forward head posture in TMD/facial pain patients—with its attendant craniocervical, neurophysiologic, and arthrokinematic interactions—may be either a causative or aggravating factor in TMD that must be treated. Read about TMD/facial pain and forward head posture.
This article discusses a retrospective study, which examined charts of 445 TMD patients to identify and categorize sites of referred pain.
Neuralgias are syndromes characterized by intermittent attacks of sharp and paroxysmal pain along the course of a nerve. The neuralgias involving the face are often misdiagnosed and seen initially by the dentist or otolaryngologist. Learn to recognize the signs and symptoms of facial neuralgias.
With a basic understanding of ear pain-related pathologies and referral patterns, a physician can provide a quick screening examination for atypical earache.
Article explains how temporomandibular joint disorders can sometimes mimic Ernest Syndrome. Often accompanied by other orofacial disorders and capable of mimicking other pain conditions, Ernest Syndrome is often missed or misdiagnosed.
Article discusses how using a hydrostatic oral appliance can help treat head, face, and neck pain in chronic pain patients.
This article discusses TMJ condylar pain from a parapharyngeal space tumor. Located in a complex, rather inaccessible region of the head and neck and lateral to the upper pharynx, a potentially life-threatening tumor in the parapharyngeal space may be overlooked.
This article examines the relationship between plantar toe flexion and mouth opening and the resulting subjective pain relief of pain to the head, neck and mandibular regions.
Cardiac-induced referred pain to the craniofacial region may drive a referral to a dentist and potentially miss the diagnosis of a life-threatening cardiac condition.
Pain and its associated issues can contribute to oral bacterial growth and inflammatory processes which, in turn, affects systemic health conditions.
While many hand tremor cases may be linked to genetic predisposition or other origin, some hand and body tremors may be trigeminal nerve-related.
This case report found that a unique monomodal treatment protocol (utilizing a passive intra-oral appliance) both verified the diagnosis and provided immediate relief to sympathetically mediated pain suffered by the patient over the previous 10 years.
Craniofacial pain symptoms are often complex in nature and can represent a variety of unrelated conditions.
TMD often coexists with daily or near-daily headache syndromes but is overlooked by many physicians in the history and physical examination.
Article discusses superior pharyngeal constrictor muscle dysfunction. Sprain or tendinitis of this large quadrilateral constrictor muscle may present as soreness, tightness, or pain at the pterygoid plate.
Pain presenting as an intense headache apparently radiating from the inner canthus of the eye or orbit, but actually referred from medial temporal tendonitis, underlines the complexity of facial structures.
Article includes a case review of a patient who presented with symptoms of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia as well as TMJ and temporal tendon-related pain symptoms.
Often misdiagnosed as otitis media or Eagle's syndrome, this relatively unknown disorder presents as soft palate pain, throat pain, ipsilateral maxillary pain, ear pain and difficulty and pain with swallowing.
Patients experiencing retro-orbital headaches that are not adequately managed by drugs may be an indication of sphenomandibularis referred pain.
Cervical-Medullary Meningioma, associated with acute and persisting pain of the head and neck, is a diagnostic challenge for doctors and patients.
This article describes a relatively little known otologic condition called Patulous Eustachian Tube. The symptoms often go unrecognized since the complaints may, and often do, mimic other ear conditions. This article discusses the assessment, differential diagnosis, and types of treatment currently being utilized for this often challenging condition.
Patulous eustachian tube is a rare ear condition that's difficult to diagnose. Read case reports in this article on patients with patulous eustachian tube.
The large array of potential pathologies for burning mouth syndrome condition requires investigative skill, tenacity, patience, and empathy to differentially diagnose and treat.
Many of the subjective symptoms of pain, stiffness, and crunching sensation in patients with TMJ dysfunction were reduced greater than 50% in 92% of the prolotherapy patients in this study. Learn more about prolotherapy for TMJ patients.
Article includes a case report of signs and symptoms of internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) co-morbid with short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks from conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT) syndrome.
It is evident to those who daily treat pain of the head and neck that it is almost a rule that head pain patients may suffer from two or more painful conditions present at the same time. In that context, please consider the following quote. Berman and Sinburg, two orthopedic surgeons, wrote in the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery that “the injury of the temporomandibular joints is part of a
TMJ Quick Screening Exam
Neuralgic Pain of the Temporomandibular Joint
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