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All Cancer Pain Articles

With cancer treatment success comes a downside— more disability and pain. Part 4 of this five-part series on cancer pain will discuss painful complications of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy.
Approximately 33% of cancer patients experience long-term pain. Many cancer patients are living longer, shifting pain management from a focus on acute pain to chronic pain. Part 3 of this four-part series on cancer pain will serve as a practical guide for commonly used adjuvant therapies and contain tips for using the most effective agents.
Ensure that cancer patients are monitored for potential adverse events related to their chemotherapy and analgesic regimens.
National and international organizations have attempted to develop guidelines to facilitate compassionate and effective cancer pain management systems, including the WHO analgesic ladder.
More cancer patients are living longer and are now experiencing chronic pain. We explore the practical aspects of pharmacologic cancer pain management.
With cancer treatment success comes a down side—more disability and pain. Many cancer patients are living longer, shifting pain management from a focus on acute pain to chronic pain. Part 1 of a five-part series on cancer pain will discuss the goals of a compassionate and multidisciplinary pain management program for treating cancer pain. The next edition will focus on pharmacologic cancer pain management.
Identifying the causes of neuropathy in cancer patients can be difficult. This review looks at the common causes of neuropathy in cancer patients, as well as effective therapies—and even preventions.
Article highlights the importance of an accurate pain assessment in cancer patients to provide maximum relief with minimum side effects.
Application of an interdisciplinary psychosocial model—along with early intervention—can change the focus from palliation of advanced pain complications to that of preempting chronicity and improving quality of life for cancer patients.
The following case study illustrates the use of a problem-based learning (PBL) format as it is applied to an individual experiencing chronic cancer pain.
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