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All CRPS/RSD/Causalgia Articles

Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) often has baffled the medical community. However, improved knowledge of pro-inflammatory cytokines and central sensitization of pain are unraveling some of the secrets behind CRPS.
By combining medication management with interventional and non-interventional therapies, patients with CRPS can often dramatically reduce their symptoms and lead full and functional lives.
Read this personal account of life with reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), and one writer's journey to regain control of her life.
Progress in understanding the pathophysiology of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS: used to be called RSD or causalgia) is leading to new and more effective treatments.
Patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome commonly describe a diverse range of sensory and motor problems. These include pain to touch or the threat of touch, temperature, color and sweating abnormalities, problems in initiating movement and reduced function.
CRPS (which used to be called RSD) is a chronic pain condition. Overview from a pain management specialist to help doctors better understand and treat CRPS.
Results and implications of this increasingly utilized option for the treatment of refractory CRPS.
Learn the basics of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS, also called RSD), including common treatments and the importance of patient education.
Article highlights the first level of evaluation for diagnosing the chronic pain patient with chronic regional pain syndrome (CRPS) using the multilevel method of diagnosis Practical Application of Neuropostural Evaluations (P.A.N.E.) process.
A case report of a patient successfully mimicking the signs and symptoms of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) together with a review of what is currently known about RSD presentation, epidemiology, and pathophysiology.
Carpal tunnel syndrome continues to be a vexing problem occupationally in industry and in the general medical population as well.